About


Whale Sail

More About Whale Sail Bed & Breakfast

The Skipper

The Boat

Where We Sail

The Cruises

What You Might See

The Skipper Judy

I was raised in Guelph and Sauble Beach Ontario, coming to B.C. in 1984 with my daughter.  I started keel boat sailing in and around 2000.   I have been living on and sailing Paloma my 45 foot CM440 for 6 years.

I hired a captain and have taken many courses, but mainly I have logged the hours, mostly single handing.  I still have lots to learn and consider each trip an educational adventure that is difficult to evaluate a cost.

I decided that I could put together some custom sailing adventures or just a day sail to see the sea life and teach sailing skills.  I want to share my experiences and get some social time as it does get a bit lonely.

As a guest you will become crew each taking a part in the adventure to our destinations. Anchoring, chart plotting etc.  All the decision making will be a team effort.  The goal is to learn but most of all enjoy the splendor of the west coast.

The Sailboat

Paloma is a 2007 Catalina Morgan 440.

20 years ago Catalina acquired Morgan and combined the best of each boat to make a comfortable cruiser, capable of blue water cruising with live aboard options. She has solar which easily charges a large bank of AGM batteries.  There is a 3 burner and oven propane stove, microwave and water maker (desalinator)

She is a wide bodied comfortable cruiser with a large cockpit and walk through transom. There are two berths, two heads with showers.  Holding tanks for water and heads.  All products are biodegradable and therefore eco friendly.

A full board of Instruments include a Garmin chartplotter and radar. For auxillary charts I have paper and Navionics on my smart phone and Ipad. Her sails are easily conformed to needs from the cockpit as she has in boom furling and of course furling forsail.  Paloma is safe due to her heavy keel and design. She has proven to me to sail well in all winds but loves to ‘run’.  I have a light wind Gennaker that I love to fly.  Due to unpredictable winds around the gulf islands, we will also be motoring, hence the term motor sailor.

She has a reliable dinghy and outboard, with safety equipment should an emergency take place.  Inventory includes 2 kayaks, paddle board,   a hammock, barbecue, downrigger , fishing gear and crab and prawn traps.

Pictures of the Paloma Sailboat

Where We Sail

Custom Private Charters and Daily Cruises

WhaleSailBnB Charters offer private, skippered sailing cruises in the Gulf Islands. Home berth is Ladner, B.C. with Paloma currently moored in Alert Bay.   The Alert Bay location is a beautiful isolated area with numerous anchorages so she can take advantage of the unique Broughton Archipelago.   We offer a variety of sailing packages, including custom options to fit any special occasion and time frame.  Cruises can range from a relaxing day on the water looking for sea-life or learning to sail.  Overnight cruises can be customized to anything on your wish list.

Custom Private Charters and Daily Cruises

DAY CRUISE From the ALERT BAY location Daily - 10:00am to 3:00pm

$100 per person / Group (Up to 4 People) Family rate negotiable,
Participate in being crew or take a seat on the bow or cockpit and relax. A great opportunity to see whales, sea lions, diving birds, eagles and perhaps a stop at the Orca Lab on Hanson Island

Telegraph Cove Daily - 9:00am to 5:00pm

$100 per person / Group $400.00 (Up to 4 People), Family rate negotiable.
Itinerary:  Begin your cruise in Alert Bay, heading south down Johnstone Straight to Telegraph Cove.  Visit the Whale Interpretive Centre; enjoy a dinner at local restaurants or a latte while watching the numerous fishing charter boats coming in with their bounty.

OVER NIGHT SAILING 2-6 NIGHTS

$120 ea person/overnite stay / Group (4) $400.00  (Family rate negotiable)
This trip will take you around the Pearse Islands past Stubbs to Double Bay on Hanson Island.  Anchor overnight and explore the numerous coves by dinghy. You can enjoy fishing, crabbing, kayaking and paddleboarding in the quiet bay.

If continuing on Paloma,  the anchorages are too numerous to include.  The trip can be plotted according to weather conditions.

Alert Bay to False Creek, Vancouver 4 nights 5 days

$100 per person / Group $400.00 per day (Up to 4 People), Family rate negotiable.
Itinerary:  Begin your cruise in Alert Bay, heading south down Johnstone Straight to Telegraph Cove.  Visit the Whale Interpretive Centre; enjoy a dinner at local restaurants or a latte while watching the numerous fishing charter boats coming in with their bounty.

FULL MOON AT SCIENCE WORLD TAKEN FROM PALOMA

What You Might See



AN AMAZING VARIETY OF BC WILDLIFE

LOCAL FISHERMEN AND A RAFT OF MURRES

Judy Setting Crab Traps

MOTOR SAILING JUST PASSED MITTLENATCH ISLAND

SAILING PAST ONE OF THE GULF ISLANDS

Orcas

Humpback

Minke

Dolphins

Eagles


Orcas

Orca whales are cetaceans, a large group of approximately 80 kinds of whales, dolphins, and porpoises. The largest member of the dolphin family (females can grow as large as 23 feet in length, while males can reach 32 feet), orca whales have highly developed brains, and like all dolphins, use sophisticated biological sonar called echolocation, to communicate with one another. When the Southern Resident Community whales arrive in Haro Strait on the southeast shores of Vancouver Island, they “announce” their arrival to other whales already in the area with their highly developed vocal activity.

Orca whales are divided into three separate categories based upon geographical location and behaviour. It is speculated that these three distinct groups of orcas in the Pacific Northwest may be the result of food preference and availability.

Resident Orcas tend to have distinct and stable migration patterns and family structures, while Transient Orca Whales are more loosely organized. It is estimated that there are approximately 450 Transient Orca Whales living along the western North American seaboard from Mexico to the Bering Sea. Little is currently known about the third category, Offshore Orcas, although they are being actively studied by scientists. Discovered in 1991, the Offshore Orcas are most commonly seen 15 to 25 miles out at sea off Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands. It is possible that this third category of whales is the ancestral population of the Northern and or the Southern Resident orca whales.


Humpback

Known to be one of the most playful whales on earth, the Humpback Whale inhabits every ocean on the planet, and is most famous for it's capability of song. During mating season, the males will sing organized and complex songs with distinct melodies and themes that can be heard over twenty miles away. These song patterns change yearly, and every few years a new song will emerge.

Of all cetaceans, the Humpback Whale seems to be the most athletic, impressing observers with much breaching, spy hopping and other such playful behaviour. In the arctic they have been seen turning over small icebergs for fun.

Scientists believe there are about 30,000-40,000 Humpback Whales in the world at present, or about 30-35% of the original population. Humpbacks are slow swimmers, making them particularly vulnerable to extensive whaling campaigns in the early 20th century. It is believed that over 100,000 Humpback Whales were killed before they were listed as endangered in 1966.

While Humpback Whales are generally not as social as other whales, they do cooperatively feed, migrate, and breed. Residing within a loose-knit social structure, Humpback Whales live individually alone, or within transient small groups that come together periodically. During the summer months they tend to stay in such groups for longer periods of time to forage and feed co-operatively.


Minke

Found in all oceans in the world, the Minke Whale, the second smallest of the baleen whales, is one of the most abundant whales and also a principal target of today's whaling industry.

Inhabiting both temperate and polar waters in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, the Minke Whale population is estimated to be over 761,000 in the Antarctic, 149,000 in North Atlantic waters, and about 25,000 in the Northwest Pacific ocean.

The Minke whale feeds primarily on fish, and krill. In the northern Pacific ocean, Pacific Saury accounts for 80% of this whale's diet. Three species of euphausiids (a shrimp-like crustacean) and one species of copepod are also part of the Minke Whale diet.

Unlike other whales (Greys, Orca's), the Minke Whale is not known to coordinate feeding and travelling patterns with other Minke's. Rather, the Minke Whale seems to conduct itself independently of other Minke's, leaving scientists to wonder how mating is conducted.

Minke Whales do not seem to produce intense or low frequency sounds as do other larger finner whales. It is suspected by researchers that the Minke Whale does not have the capacity to communicate over great distances with one another.

While the Minke Whale population remains relatively high in the Pacific Northeast, they are not as observed as other whales such as Orca's, Humpback's, and Gray Whales.  Minke's will often swim to the surface of the water for 3-5 blows, then descend for a 3-7 minute dive. In Iceland and Scotland, however, the Minke Whale is the main event for whale watching companies, as they are much more predictable there.

During the 1970's Minke Whales were hunted for everything from cosmetics to mink food, and for human consumption.  They are currently hunted in the North Atlantic, the Northwest Pacific Ocean, and the Antarctic primarily for human consumption.


Dolphins

Pacific White Sided Dolphin is a long name for a relatively small marine mammal. And the Latin name is even more of a mouthful, so they are also called Lags for short. It’s a much easier name to explain exactly what species of cetacean is seen, especially over a marine radio.

These gregarious dolphins travel in groups that, on occasion, reach numbers of up to approximately 3,000 which is a spectacular sight I have only seen once in all these years. Most frequently their groups are between 20 to 100. If you don’t see more than a couple, you might want to keep a look out, there are usually more not too far off.

Lags can travel quickly reaching speeds of up to 25 knots (almost 30 mph or 47 kph) effortlessly. They are very acrobatic and their frequent airborne flips and leaps can reach extreme heights. These leaps can help distinguish a smaller group of Pacific White Sided dolphins from Dall’s porpoises when they are in feeding mode and only seem to be creating splashes. Somehow, they can’t seem to resist a good leap for too long. One of the alternating photos on the top of this page shows a group chasing fish directly towards my boat after using the sound of the boat motor to help them corral fish. These are not dumb animals. There are many encounters and observations of them that has shown their intelligence and playfulness.

Orca whales are divided into three separate categories based upon geographical location and behaviour. It is speculated that these three distinct groups of orcas in the Pacific Northwest may be the result of food preference and availability.

Resident Orcas tend to have distinct and stable migration patterns and family structures, while Transient Orca Whales are more loosely organized. It is estimated that there are approximately 450 Transient Orca Whales living along the western North American seaboard from Mexico to the Bering Sea. Little is currently known about the third category, Offshore Orcas, although they are being actively studied by scientists. Discovered in 1991, the Offshore Orcas are most commonly seen 15 to 25 miles out at sea off Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands. It is possible that this third category of whales is the ancestral population of the Northern and or the Southern Resident orca whales.


Eagles

Weighing from 7 to 15 pounds and having a wing span of 6 - 8 feet, the Bald Eagle is one of the largest birds in North America, with the female being larger than the male.

Found over most of North America from Alaska and Canada to northern Mexico, approximately 20,000 bald eagles live in British Columbia, and over 70,000 live in Alaska, roughly half of the world's Bald Eagle population. Indeed, the high salmon stocks in this region account for the Bald Eagle's prominent presence.

Reaching speeds of about 35 mph, flying to an altitude of 10,000 feet, and possessing a lifting power of about 4 pounds, the Bald Eagle is indeed a strong bird with a hunting area varying between 1,700 to 10,000 acres. Once paired, bald eagles will remain together until one dies.